Index of Articles

Author:
Mark Duckworth
Post date 01/04/2010 - 00:00
Summary of article:

Problems with rising damp, condensation and ingress of water
BRE studies have shown 1 in 6 properties suffer with condensation. It is symptomatic of a problem with primarily insufficient ventilation together with irregular heating patterns, inadequate insulation and the occupant’s lifestyle. Each property is unique and has many variables affecting it. This paper shows how a basic audit can be conducted to define the key contributing factors and then propose appropriate solutions.

Author:
Ian Rock MRICS
Post date 01/04/2010 - 00:00
Summary of article:

How to convert a loft and avoid many of the potential problems
This article is all about how to convert a loft.  It takes you through the process of working out the best design, applying for planning permission where necessary and then then on to the actual conversion itself.
Contents
1.  What’s so good about loft conversions?
2.  What’s new? - Legislation 
3.  Key design options
4.  What Type of Roof ?
5.  Complying with Fire
6.  Loft stairs
7.  Designing the new structure
8.  Loft windows
9.  Loft confusion
10. Surveying lofts
11. Case Study

http://www.localsurveyorsdirect.co.uk/architects-design-drawing.aspx

Author:
Mike Royall ACGI BSc CEng MICE MCIArb
Post date 01/11/2007 - 00:00
Summary of article:

An oveview of the The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007.
Significant changes to the original 1994 CDM Regulations have now come into force.  The Planning Supervisor role is defunct but there is a new role, that of CDM Coordinator.  This presentation will explain the regulations and the duties of clients, the design team, builders and sub-contractors.  Everyone in the building industry is involved and must be familiar with the new regulations and understand their duties.

Author:
David Dixon of Land Mark
Post date 01/11/2007 - 00:00
Summary of article:

The rise of geospatial data and access to environmental information from the internet Impacts for the property professional
Google Maps and Microsoft Live have made mapping familiar to us all.  This paper looks at the impact of internet mapping, the sources and applications property professionals use mapping for now and what are the likely future developments.  Barely a day goes by without the mention of the environment in the news. Professional bodies such as the Law Society and RICS produce guidance advising how their members should deal with the issues and advise their clients.  We look here who is doing what currently and at what information can be ascertained easily from the internet and/or alternatively from the environmental market place. Impacts for the property professional

Author:
Stephen Bond
Post date 01/11/2006 - 00:00
Summary of article:

Condition surveys of historic buildings and sites often present the surveyor with challenges
Condition surveys of historic buildings and sites often present the surveyor with different challenges to those experienced with other building types.  Often the surveyor is confronted with materials, building elements and components that are in some way or another unusual or unexpected.  Using a range of case studies, this session will look in a practical way at some of the potential pitfalls that may be encountered and seek to develop an appreciation of the art (and science) of surveying historic structures.

Author:
Carl Calvert MSc(Oxon) MA PgDLaw MRICS CITP MBCS FRIN FInstC
Post date 01/03/2006 - 00:00
Summary of article:

Defining boundaries. A prespective from a Chartered Surveyor.
The new Land Registration Act 2002 came into force on 13 October 2003 and the Land Registration Rules 2003 now apply. The questions that fall out of this are:
I have a Land Registry Filed Plan does it really show me the legal boundary?
I occupy more land than shown on my Plan. Is it mine?
My neighbour has a right of way over my land. How wide is that way?
The use of land surveying, mapping, photography and other documents is succinctly explained in this paper. Carl Calvert is a Chartered Land Surveyor and part-time university lecturer in law for Geographic Information Systems.

Author:
Mike Royall ACGI BSc CEng MICE MCIArb
Post date 01/03/2006 - 00:00
Summary of article:

Investigating subsidence problems with badly built conservatories
Construction of most conservatories takes place without conformance to building regulations. Many installers of conservatories carry out excellent work however some don’t. This paper looks at a number of case studies examining the problems that sometimes result and the solutions to these. Mike Royal is a Civil Engineer with a great deal of knowledge of conservatories and in particular associated subsidence.

Author:
Chris Overbeke of OMC Associates
Post date 01/03/2006 - 00:00
Summary of article:

Investigating large trees growing close to buildings
Trees are commonly highlighted in building surveys for no other reason than the fact that they are there. As a result we lose a lot of trees where removal may not be necessary. This presentation examines some of the factors that determine whether trees really do pose potential threats to buildings. Trees on shrinkable clay can often cause subsidence problems in buildings but trees growing in chalk usually do not cause problems.  This paper looks at lots of case examples to help understand what the issues are.

 

Author:
Bob Bennett M.B.E
Post date 01/03/2005 - 00:00
Summary of article:

Old buildings often suffer with damp but it is seldom an historic problem.  Alterations both internally and externally, using inappropriate materials, often create damp problems, as does raising flower beds or repointing a lime mortar wall with cement.  Bob Bennett is a masonry consultant and co founder of the Building Limes Forum.

Author:
Ian Caldwell Bsc(Hons) CEng MICE MIStructE
Post date 01/03/2005 - 00:00
Summary of article:

Carefull engineering works to avoid old mine works causing subsidence in buildings.
The legacy of past mine working in the UK poses many problems to both brown field and green field sites.  This paper discusses the history, geology, technical aspects and design solutions to overcome these problems.  Problems associated with abandoned mining workings occur throughout many regions of the United Kingdom and pose varying problems to many sites and developments. These factors should never be ignored when developing a site or the assessment of an existing structure for either sale or redevelopment purposes.

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