Index of Articles

Author:
Dr Tim Havard, The Oakbrook Consultancy
Post date 29/11/2013 - 14:32
Summary of article:

As is always the case in a downturn, lenders and borrowers tend to turn to the one party in the process who holds professional indemnity insurance to try and recoup some of their losses; the valuer. The period of instability following the onset of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) has been no exception.
Although few negligence cases actually reach court, there have been a number of cases where some key aspects of the negligence and error issues have been developed and refined recently. These have included developments in the 'margin for error' question – what level of valuation is deemed to be negligent, a question that the courts and valuers have been arguing about for many years, as well as rulings on contributory negligence, the extent of loss and on valuing in thin and unstable markets.

Author:
David Mahon B Sc. Hons MICFor M. Arbor A
Post date 22/11/2013 - 08:57
Summary of article:

Low rise buildings on shrinkable clay soils are vulnerable to movement and structural damage due to moisture abstraction by trees and other vegetation groups. Over the last 10 years domestic subsidence claims number between 28,000 to 55,000 costing the insurance industry £140M - £400M annually. A significant proportion of these claims relate to the influence of trees and other vegetation groups.

Tree loss due to subsidence damage claims to low rise buildings is a contentious issue in the UK. Undoubtedly tree removals can have a high negative impact on amenity and the environment at the local level. At the wider level, the impact is generally less than commonly thought. The issue is frequently covered in the national press with hysterical claims of mass tree removals instigated by insurers and exaggerated evaluations of risk from trees based on ignorance, limited data and lack of evidence.

Author:
Ross Allan of Timberwise
Post date 21/11/2013 - 08:44
Summary of article:

This paper gives an overview of the life cycle of beetle and fungal attack, how infestation and decay manifest themselves in buildings. We will give tips on how to identify the different species and how to determine if there is activity or not. We will also look at the various courses of action/treatment to eliminate the problem.

Author:
Stuart J. Frame
Post date 01/11/2012 - 16:42
Summary of article:

This paper was written to complement a talk given by Stuart Frame to a group of Surveyors on a training course in October 2012 run by CPD Conferences.  The paper was primarily aimed at those practising as party wall surveyors. It discusses the applicability of the Party Wall Act where no initiating notice has been served, and in particular the use of retrospective awards. Surveyors' duties in administering the Act is also examined, with consideration to some of the difficulties that can arise in practice.

Author:
Carl Calvert MSc MA PgDLaw FRICS CITP MBCS FRIN MBCartoS
Post date 01/11/2012 - 16:28
Summary of article:

This paper was written to complement a talk given by Carl Calvert to a group of Surveyors on a training course in October 2012 run by CPD Conferences.  The paper covers the role of an Expert Witness relating to Boundary Disputes.  In particular; Civil Procedure Rules 1999, Expert Witness rules (Expert Witness Institute), Practice directions.  The differences between a legal boundary and a physical boundary?  The paper also outlines the best assistance a surveyor can give the courts on boundaries?

Author:
Post date 16/08/2012 - 17:44
Summary of article:

An update on the ABE

Formed in 1925, as the Incorporated Association of Architects and Surveyors, the Association of Building Engineers (ABE) is a leading body for professionals specialising in the design, construction, evaluation and maintenance of building construction.  Its members practise across the United Kingdom, mainland Europe and around the World, and work in both the private and public sectors. The ABE provides the prime qualification of Building Engineer, a title that exactly reflects the professional expertise of members.

Author:
M D Royall ACGI BSc CEng MICE MFPWS
Post date 29/03/2012 - 22:14
Summary of article:

SUBSIDENCE
CLAY SHRINKAGE
INSPECTION of BUILDINGS
ASSESSING THE SEVERITY
INVESTIGATIONS and MONITORING
REPAIRS and REMEDIAL WORKS
OTHER CRACKS...http://www.localsurveyorsdirect.co.uk/structural-engineers-inpsection-reports.aspx

Author:
Simon Ayres of Lime Green Products Ltd
Post date 29/03/2012 - 22:07
Summary of article:

About 40% of the UK housing stock is of solid walled construction and this amounts to approximately 4.4 million houses that were built before 1920. Often built of lime mortar these buildings are of a vapour permeable construction and so function differently from modern cavity walled houses. With many of these old buildings being cold and energy inefficient, there is often a desire to thermally upgrade them, however, the latest research shows that many of the current refurbishment methods will lead to real problems, often damp and condensation. This talk gives an overview of thermal improvement techniques and the specification of breathable materials for old buildings.

Author:
Mark Womersley, Womersley’s Ltd
Post date 29/03/2012 - 22:00
Summary of article:

This paper covers
The origins of paint and its development
The need for old buildings to breathe
The need for timber to flex
Paint types
 

Author:
Adrian Ogden
Post date 15/11/2011 - 10:30
Summary of article:

Air Conditioning TM44 Energy Report Guidelines
Directive 2002/91/EC of the Energy Performance of Buildings Article 9, requires member states to introduce measures to establish a method of checking all air conditioning systems, by formal inspection and report means, to minimise energy usage and carbon footprint.

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